SLU Faculty/Staff May College 2022

Stickerkitty research blog Blog started in 2008 as .com (thanks to Amy Hauber for help with original set up) and migrated with new features to .org in 2021 (thanks to Sarah Knobel); 387 posts published as of 5.20.22 Plugged (catalogued digital archives + uncatalogued Flickr sites – see below) Gallery (images that feed from Stickerkitty’s collection on Flickr) Readings + I.W.W. “Stickerettes” Bibliography Miscellany (C.V./Contact; DO SOMETHING [OBEY]; Les Chats) Multiple links on the right column grouped by artists, themes, countries) Posts about Industrial Workers of the World (I.W.W.) “stickerettes” or “silent agitators” (1910s-present) Posts about Adding images of I.W.W.…

Featured artists/activists: Slavers of New York

The Slavers of New York sticker campaign and guerrilla education initiative is the work of three independent activists, Ada Reso, Maria Robles, and Elsa Eli Waithe, who in 2020 began posting stickers that looked like street signs altered to name New York City’s early slaveowners. Using census and manumission records, newspaper listings, and in-depth historical research, they have identified over 200 government officials, businessmen, and wealthy farmers who owned or traded enslaved people from the 1600s through the early 1800s. For the group’s first sticker, Elsa notes, “Nostrand Ave. is seven miles long in Brooklyn. And … what’s really egregious…

1937 Advertisement for I.W.W. “Stickerettes”

Someone who asked to remain anonymous kindly sent me a gift out of the blue last month of the May 1937 edition of the I.W.W. publication, The One Big Union Monthly. Featured on the back cover is an advertisement for stickers on sale for $2.00 per thousand. It still surprises me how prolific these stickerettes/stickers were in the early 1900s and how rare they are to find today. While I recognize most of the images, the two black and white cartoons featured here are completely new to me. These are some of the actual stickers. This was also on the…

Featured artist: Avram Finkelstein, Part I

Avram Finkelstein is an AIDS activist, artist, writer, and during the late 1980s, a co-founding member of the legendary Silence=Death and Gran Fury collectives in New York City. In 1986, he and five others designed the iconic “Silence=Death” poster, which was soon shared with ACT UP, the AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power, in order to propel the image’s ubiquity through buttons, t-shirts, and stickers. He states, “[t]he AIDS activist community… actually created it, a community in search of its voice, one that went on to find it through the activation of its own social spaces. [The Silence=Death] image, as we…

Covid-19 Conspiracy and Anti-Vaxx Stickers in Potsdam, NY

I found a rash of Covid-19 conspiracy and anti-vaxx stickers last week in Potsdam, NY, stretching down two blocks on Market Street in front of many of the main stores and restaurants in town that were open during the busy holiday season. These stickers didn’t list the “Join the White Rose” disinformation group like the stickers that I wrote about from NYC last November, but the QR code on one of them linked to Open VAERS, a legitimate vaccine adverse reaction event reporting system run in the United States by the Centers for Disease Control and the Food and Drug…

Covid-19 Conspiracy and Disinformation Stickers in NYC

I was able to go to NYC last weekend for the first time since January 2020, curious to see what the stickers would be like there after such a tumultuous couple of years in the United States, post-Trump and in the midst of a global pandemic. Saturday evening in midtown yielded few stickers at all, and surprisingly, almost nothing related to current affairs. Ho hum, snooze. Thanks, America. There were a few, though. On Sunday morning, I had seen some footage on Sandi Bachom’s and Ron Filipkowski’s Twitter feeds about a group of Proud Boys marching in the city the…

Chapter proposal: Street Art Stickers as Subversive Visual Discourse

A chapter proposal that I submitted for a new anthology was recently accepted! Entitled Unframing the Visual: Visual Literacy Pedagogy in Academic Libraries and Information Spaces, the volume will be published as a companion piece to the Association of College and Research Libraries’ Framework for Information Literacy in Higher Education (2016). The new collection features four sections: participating in a changing visual information landscape; perceiving visuals as communicating information; practicing visual discernment and criticality; and pursuing social justice through visual practice. My proposal was accepted for the section on pursuing social justice through visual practice. My chapter proposal Publicly-placed stickers…

“SHE SLAPS!” featured artist: Yarn Vandalette (Germany)

Please provide a brief description of your work. I am a crochet girl – crochet queen some people say! – with an heavy addiction to street art. I was fascinated by graffiti since the mid-eighties. I kind of grew up on old school Hip-hop and graffiti was huge part of it. But I was never brave enough to go out with the cans myself (what a shame, I still regret it ?), I rather kept on dancing and admiring the art. When I relearned crochet a couple of years ago ( I haven´t done it in about 30 years) I…

“SHE SLAPS!” featured artist: Das Frohlein Moodmacher (Germany)

Please provide a brief description of your work. Hey, my name is Das Frohlein Moodmacher. Froh is the German word for cheerfully. So my intention is to spread cheerful moods with my work. I make handmade paper collages mainly with eggheads. I want to put a smile on peoples’ faces with my art. Making stickers is a wonderful opportunity to spread my moods in the streets. Does being a female artist, or identifying as a female artist, influence your work, and if so, how? Being a woman influences my work insofar as i started making collages to regain some time…

“SHE SLAPS!” featured artist: Fymsa (Russia)

Please provide a brief description of your work. The main point of my sticker art, in general, is proving my existence. It’s like the goal of my art. But all my characters are women and it is a very important manifestation of my feelings about my own sex and gender and its place in the world. Does being a female artist, or identifying as a female artist, influence your work, and if so, how? It influences from the inside, not like something specially planned. I’m proud to create cool female characters, it’s good to be close to your characters in…